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Aephraim Steinberg

Aephraim Steinberg is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.  He is also a founding member of Toronto's Institute for Optical Sciences, a member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), an affiliate member of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and a principal investigator in Photonics Research Ontario, the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations, and QuantumWorks. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1988 and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1994.  He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Université de Paris VI and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology before moving to Toronto in 1996.  He has been a guest professor at the University of Vienna; the Institut d'Optique Théorique et Appliquée in Orsay, France; and the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2006, he received the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal and the Rutherford Medal in Physics from the Royal Society of Canada.  In 2007, he received a Steacie Fellowship from NSERC, and a McLean Fellowship (Connaught Foundation, University of Toronto).  He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He joined CIFAR's Quantum Information Science Program in 2003. Dr. Steinberg’s interests lie in fundamental quantum-mechanical phenomena and the control & characterization of the quantum states of systems ranging from laser-cooled atoms to individual photons.  His experimental program is two-pronged, using both nonclassical two-photon interference and laser-cooled atoms to study issues such as quantum information & computation, decoherence and the quantum-classical boundary, tunneling times, weak measurement & retrodiction in quantum mechanics, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states. (source: University of Toronto)  

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Aephraim Steinberg

Aephraim Steinberg is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.  He is also a founding member of Toronto's Institute for Optical Sciences, a member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), an affiliate member of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and a principal investigator in Photonics Research Ontario, the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations, and QuantumWorks. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1988 and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1994.  He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Université de Paris VI and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology before moving to Toronto in 1996.  He has been a guest professor at the University of Vienna; the Institut d'Optique Théorique et Appliquée in Orsay, France; and the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2006, he received the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal and the Rutherford Medal in Physics from the Royal Society of Canada.  In 2007, he received a Steacie Fellowship from NSERC, and a McLean Fellowship (Connaught Foundation, University of Toronto).  He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He joined CIFAR's Quantum Information Science Program in 2003. Dr. Steinberg’s interests lie in fundamental quantum-mechanical phenomena and the control & characterization of the quantum states of systems ranging from laser-cooled atoms to individual photons.  His experimental program is two-pronged, using both nonclassical two-photon interference and laser-cooled atoms to study issues such as quantum information & computation, decoherence and the quantum-classical boundary, tunneling times, weak measurement & retrodiction in quantum mechanics, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states. (source: University of Toronto)  

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Stephen Adler (b. 1939 in New York City) is an American physicist specializing in elementary particles and field theory. He received an A.B. degree at Harvard University in 1961 and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1964. He became a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in 1966, becoming a full Professor of Theoretical Physics in 1969, and was named "New Jersey Albert Einstein Professor" at the institute in 1979. He has won the J. J. Sakurai Prize from the American Physical Society in 1988, and the Dirac Medal of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in 1998, among other awards. Adler's seminal papers on high energy neutrino processes, current algebras, soft pion theorems, sum rules, and perturbation theory anomalies helped lay the foundations for the current standard model of elementary particle physics. Princeton University, Ph.D. 1964; Harvard University, Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows, 1964–66; California Institute of Technology, Research Associate 1966; Princeton University, Visiting Lecturer 1969; Institute for Advanced Study, Member 1966–69, New Jersey Albert Einstein Professor 1979–2003, Professor 1969–2010, Professor Emeritus 2010–; American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow; American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow; American Physical Society, Fellow; National Academy of Sciences, Member; American Physical Society, J. J. Sakurai Prize 1988; International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Dirac Prize and Medal 1998