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Aephraim Steinberg

Aephraim Steinberg is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.  He is also a founding member of Toronto's Institute for Optical Sciences, a member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), an affiliate member of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and a principal investigator in Photonics Research Ontario, the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations, and QuantumWorks. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1988 and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1994.  He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Université de Paris VI and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology before moving to Toronto in 1996.  He has been a guest professor at the University of Vienna; the Institut d'Optique Théorique et Appliquée in Orsay, France; and the University of Queensland in Australia.  In 2006, he received the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal and the Rutherford Medal in Physics from the Royal Society of Canada.  In 2007, he received a Steacie Fellowship from NSERC, and a McLean Fellowship (Connaught Foundation, University of Toronto).  He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He joined CIFAR's Quantum Information Science Program in 2003. Dr. Steinberg’s interests lie in fundamental quantum-mechanical phenomena and the control & characterization of the quantum states of systems ranging from laser-cooled atoms to individual photons.  His experimental program is two-pronged, using both nonclassical two-photon interference and laser-cooled atoms to study issues such as quantum information & computation, decoherence and the quantum-classical boundary, tunneling times, weak measurement & retrodiction in quantum mechanics, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states.

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Aephraim Steinberg

Aephraim Steinberg is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.  He is also a founding member of Toronto's Institute for Optical Sciences, a member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), an affiliate member of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and a principal investigator in Photonics Research Ontario, the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations, and QuantumWorks. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1988 and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1994.  He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Université de Paris VI and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology before moving to Toronto in 1996.  He has been a guest professor at the University of Vienna; the Institut d'Optique Théorique et Appliquée in Orsay, France; and the University of Queensland in Australia.  In 2006, he received the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal and the Rutherford Medal in Physics from the Royal Society of Canada.  In 2007, he received a Steacie Fellowship from NSERC, and a McLean Fellowship (Connaught Foundation, University of Toronto).  He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He joined CIFAR's Quantum Information Science Program in 2003. Dr. Steinberg’s interests lie in fundamental quantum-mechanical phenomena and the control & characterization of the quantum states of systems ranging from laser-cooled atoms to individual photons.  His experimental program is two-pronged, using both nonclassical two-photon interference and laser-cooled atoms to study issues such as quantum information & computation, decoherence and the quantum-classical boundary, tunneling times, weak measurement & retrodiction in quantum mechanics, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states.

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profile Paavo Pylkkänen

Paavo Pylkkänen, Ph.D., is Senior Lecturer in Theoretical Philosophy and Director of the Bachelor’s Program in Philosophy at the University of Helsinki. He is also Associate Professor of Theoretical Philosophy (currently on leave) at the Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Philosophy, University of Skövde, where he initiated a Consciousness Studies Program. His main research areas are philosophy of mind, philosophy of physics and their intersection. The central problem in philosophy of mind is how to understand the place of mind – and especially conscious experience – in the physical world. Pylkkänen has explored whether this problem can be approached in a new way in the framework of the new holistic and dynamic worldview that is emerging from quantum theory and relativity. He has in particular been inspired by the physicists David Bohm and Basil Hiley’s interpretation of quantum theory and has collaborated with both of them. In his 2007 book Mind, Matter and the Implicate Order (Springer) he proposed that Bohmian notions such as active information and implicate order provide new ways of approaching key problems in philosophy of mind, such as mental causation and time consciousness. The overall aim of his research is to develop a scientific metaphysics. Paavo Pylkkänen has been a visiting researcher in Stanford University, Oxford University, London University, Charles University Prague and Gothenburg University and is a member of the Academy of Finland Center of Excellence in the Philosophy of Social Sciences (TINT).

profile Ana María Cetto

Prof. Ana María Cetto, Research professor of the Institute of Physics and lecturer at the Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Ana María Cetto is a full-time research Professor at the Institute of Physics, and lecturer at the Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). She holds an M.A. in Biophysics from Harvard University and a M.S c and Ph.D in Physics from UNAM. Her main field of research is theoretical physics, with emphasis on the foundations of quantam mechanics, where she has contributed substantially to the development of stochastic electrodynamics. She is co-author of "The Quantum Dice" (Kluwer, 1996). Prof. Cetto is the former Dean of the Faculty of Sciences, and former head of the Theoretical Physics Department at the Institute of Physics. She chaired the project for the Museum on Light (UNAM), inaugurated in 1996. She served as consultant for the UNESCO World Conference of Science (1999). From 2003 to 2010 she served as Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Nobel Peace Prize 2005), where she headed the Department of Technical Cooperation. She is founding President of LATINDEX, online information system for Ibero-American and Caribbean scholary journals. Prof Cetto has held honorary positions in a number of international organisations, such as the Executive Boards of Interciencia Association, Third World Organisation for Women in Science (TWOWS, Co-founder) and International Council for Science (ICSU), the Board of Trustees of International Foundation for Science (IFS), the Governing Board of United Nations University (UNU), the Council of International Network of Engineers and Scientists (INES) and the Executive Committee of Pugwash Conferences (Nobel Peace Prize 1995). She was appointed Mexico's Woman of the Year in 2003.

profile Hrvoje Nikolic

Education 2001 PhD in physics (University of Zagreb) 1998 Master degree in physics (University of Zagreb) 1995 Bachelor degree in physics (University of Zagreb) Awards and Achievements - Ruđer-Bošković-Institute director award for a published paper in physics (2010) - Honorable Mention of the Gravity Research Foundation 2006 Essay Competition - Honorable Mention of the Gravity Research Foundation 2005 Essay Competition Classes Physics I, 2001-2002 (Faculty of Electric and Computer Engineering, University of Zagreb, Croatia) Featured Publications - H. Nikolić, Horava-Lifshitz gravity, absolute time, and objective particles in curved space, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 25, 1595 (2010). - H. Nikolić, QFT as pilot-wave theory of particle creation and destruction, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 25, 1477 (2010). - H. Nikolić, Resolving the black-hole information paradox by treating time on an equal footing with space, Phys. Lett. B 678, 218 (2009). - H. Nikolić, Time in relativistic and nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, Int. J. Quantum Inf. 7, 595 (2009). - H. Nikolić, Unparticle as a particle with arbitrary mass, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 23, 2645 (2008). - H. Nikolić, Quantum mechanics: Myths and facts, Found. Phys. 37, 1563 (2007). - B. Guberina, R. Horvat, H. Nikolić, Dynamical dark energy with a constant vacuum energy density, Phys. Let. B 636, 80 (2006). - B. Guberina, R. Horvat, H. Nikolić, Generalized holographic dark energy and the IR cutoff problem, Phys. Rev. D 72, 125011 (2005). - H. Nikolić, Relativistic contraction and related effects in noninertial frames, Phys. Rev. A 61, 032109 (2000).

profile Matt Leifer

I, Matt Leifer, am an academic who straddles the line somewhere between mathematics, philosophy, and theoretical physics. My main interests are in Quantum Information Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Theory. I received my bachelors degree in Physics with Theoretical Physics from The University of Manchester in 1999, followed by a Masters of Advanced Study in Mathemaics (Maths Tripos part III) from the Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge in 2000, where I was a member of Girton College. I studied for my Ph.D. in the School of Mathematics at the Univeristy of Bristol (2000-2003) under the supervision of Prof. Noah Linden, where I was a member of the Quantum Computing Group. After a brief stint as a research assistant at Bristol, I arrived at Perimeter Institute as a Postdoctoral Fellow in January 2004, where I worked until September 2006. From October 2006, I was a research associate in the Centre for Quantum Computation at the University of Cambridge for three months. In January 2007, I arrived back in Waterloo for a second postdoctoral position, in which I was affiliated with the Institute for Quantum Computing and the Department of Applied Math at the University of Waterloo, and with the Perimeter Institute. The latter was due to a research grant from the Foundational Questions Institute. Between April 2008 and August 2010, I was on leave of absence from work due to illness, after which I returned to work on a part time basis at University College London in the Quantum Information Group of the Physics and Astronomy department. Between December 2011 and August 2013, I was off work again due to illness. Since August 2013, I have returned to the Perimeter Institute as a long term visitor. For further information about me, take a look at my CV, or download the pdf version. You can also view my Google Scholar profile.